Filed under Teaching Tips

Teaching Competitive Game Skills

A reader recently wrote me asking if I had any games that might be used to help her rider with autism who has a hard time losing sports games, to the extent it takes him several days to recover, and says he hates everything, that his horse is bad, and that he is bad. While I … Continue reading

Volunteer Management

When you first start teaching, it’s easy to fixate on your rider and forget the rest of the world. However, often your volunteers need just as much feedback and praise – if not more! So here are some notes on basic volunteer management. VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT The role of a TRI isn’t just teaching the rider, … Continue reading

Note Sheet for Observing a Lesson

This is a follow up to the post “Watching a Therapeutic Riding Lesson“. In that post I described what to look for when you observe a lesson. Now I am giving you a hand out to use for taking notes. It is especially helpful for Instructors in Training as they learn what to look for … Continue reading

What, How, Why, Where

Inspired by an email I received a while ago from a reader inquiring about the… What, How, Why, Where The “What, How, Why and Where” of teaching are used all the time! But more specifically… Use these during the first explanation of a new riding skill: “This is WHAT we are going to learn, HOW … Continue reading

The Impact of Horse Movement and Handling on the Rider

The following notes are from the 2014 PATH Intl Conference seminar “The Effects of Equine Handling on the Biomechanics of Mounted Human Subjects” given by Celia Bower, PT, HPCS, and Margo Dewkett, Master Instructor, of Windridge Therapeutic Equestrian Center of East TX, who has been utilizing hippotherapy for 10 years active in researching efforts to validate equine movement … Continue reading

Teaching Tips: Social Stories

Social Stories What A “Social Story” is a story used to model appropriate social interaction by describing a situation with relevant social cues, other’s perspectives, and a suggested appropriate response. Why Helps teach students routines, expectations, and behavioral standards in an alternative format (story, visual, etc.) Can be personalized to individual behavioral intervention Particularly helpful/popular … Continue reading

Adaptations and Teaching Techniques for Riders with Severe Disabilities, Part 6: Example Riders, Cont.

Adaptations and Teaching Techniques for Riders with Severe Disabilities, Part 6: Example Riders, Cont. Rider #3 Rider Info Age: 9 Gender: Male Diagnosis: Mitochondrial Ecephalmyopathy Mitochondrial Ecephalmyopathy is a condition caused by mutations in the genes in mitochondrial DNA, affecting the brain and nervous system (“encephalo”) and muscles (“myopathy”). It can cause muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, hearing loss, … Continue reading

Adaptations and Teaching Techniques for Riders with Severe Disabilities, Part 5: Example Riders

Adaptations and Teaching Techniques for Riders with Severe Disabilities, Part 5: Example Riders Rider #1 Much thanks to my coworker Annie Cornette from PALS for writing the following about one of our riders with whom she has had much success. Rider Info Age: 13 Gender: Female Diagnosis: Cerebral Palsy (spastic) Additional details/conditions: increased spasticity in the lower and … Continue reading